Monthly Archives: July 2011

How the liberation on business hours affects traditional family values

I clearly lost the pole position during the qualifications. I could have made it right there at 4pm, when the doors opened for the supermarket. Now I have to take what they left over and wait in long lines with them at the cash point. Them, that is literally hundreds of people, being overly excited about the opportunity of shopping on this rainy Sunday afternoon. Since in Groningen there is only one supermarket open on that particular day, it seems as if half the city is getting on its feet to do what they could have been doing during the previous 6 days – spend money. While the idea behind opening trade on Sunday is not new, it seems to have a major impact on what used to be the traditional Sunday setting – a day spent with the family and loved ones (and of course the obligatory visit to the football ground!). Limiting the opportunities for doing the groceries to one supermarket only creates this bizarre image of an entire city eager for shopping, while the other days of the week are rather calm. Of course they are, the activities are spread across many places and many hours. So what makes the idea of shopping on a Sunday so special and why do people experience it as something spectacular? During my time in Tartu, Estonia I saw shops being open every day, sometimes only closing a bit earlier on Sunday evenings. People were accustomed to it and acted (=spent) accordingly. Now back here in Groningen, time and leisure have a different connotation on a Sunday. You normally spend that day sleeping in long, cooking something nice for supper and maybe meet a friend in the center for a cup of coffee. Now with the extra option of doing the groceries, the ease of a Sunday afternoon life gets more and more attacked by those that want you to like spending money in every moment.
Of course I am not complaining, why should I? I just bought my dinner at this Sunday afternoon supermarket. You will most likely find no one complaining about it. Because after all, there are only beneficiaries: me, who gets his pack of cottage cheese, the cashiers who earn an extra shift and uncountable numbers of people who deliberately decided to turn their backs at values that once met the world to many and that now has become a distant memory in times of unlimited opportunities.
Oh, the line of people in front of me has slightly moved closer to the cash point…

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