Category Archives: values

Introducing: 1 child, 1 present

Today, I want to present a very social topic to you.

Two good friends of mine have recently started a new blog, called A couple of the green hearts. In that blog, Maria and Sander want to explore one green trend each week, seeing whether it is possible (both financially and organizationally) to shift your life to a more greener solution. Besides these truly fascinating ideas, the two have of them have come up with an even better idea of how to spend a life meaningfully:

Each year, too many children in the world cannot celebrate a Christmas as we can. They face troubles in life beyond their own capabilities and maturity level. Their parents do their utmost to support them through their life, but too often, finding the money and energy to provide a meaningful Christmas is out of the question.
Maria, as a native Russian, saw this being a major problem. She contacted a well-trusted NGO in Russia and received a list of 80 children. 40 live in an orphanage just outside of Moscow, the other 40 are spread all across the country with their parents whose incomes are barely enough to survive. This is where you and I can come in. Maria and Sander have opened a section in their green blog on this wonderful Christmas fundraiser:

1 present for 1 child

What they ask from you is simply: Give money. You don’t even have to think much about what sort of gifts you could buy, because Maria and Sander have taken care of this already. All they want is a relatively small donation from you (10€ per child) for a child in Russia, so that this year’s Christmas might be a little less sad and a lot more happy! Please, be so kind and explore this unique idea from two people, who couldn’t be more altruistic and caring!

Don’t think about the money, think about all that money can do for a soul, who just want to spend Christmas like you, like me, like every child.

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how the age outgrew me

I have been a passionate football supporter for many years now (and still plenty to come from here). Throughout most of these years, I was lucky enough to still be of a certain age here most players I’d know and even see in town every now and then would be somewhat older than me, more experienced than me and, well yeah, much much cooler than I could ever expect to become! For the greater part of these years, I’d dedicate my “childish” passion to those players aged 28 – 30+, because they were much older, much more talented but would also say the occasional “hey” in the city center, giving me a good feeling about myself.
In short, I saw people I could idolize, very important at the time being when a youngster like me longed for identity and recognition.

Today, however, I wake up, seeing most players just graduating from school, starting a (professional) career or playing football at the side. And let’s face it, they are all much younger than me. A personal connection to any of them is not possible for me anymore, though I would not deny any.
The youth outgrew me, making me see football less a passion with people I’d define as “special cool guys” but a bunch of youngster willing to play for money/fame/fun who might even see me as a person of an indefinable older generation soon. Which is good, I reckon. After all, it is not the players that I should idolize, but the team I am passionate about. Players are just a commodity for a much wider plan. i do realize that now.
But I had to outgrow first…


Day #4 after arrival – Comparing Estonia and Germany

It is Monday noonish so I have spent about 100 hours in Tartu so far. The city is still rather empty (since classes won’t start for another 9 days) but especially at night there is a lot of traffic on both roads and pedestrian streets. The main reason for that may be the film festival Tartuff, which had its last day of action on Saturday evening, when locals performed what I would describe as singer/songwriter music. Besides that, of course, films were shown on a huge (huge!!!) inflatable screen in front of the municipality. May it be the heavy rain caused the moderate amount of people interested or it was due to the movie, which stared Corinna Harfouch and Bruno Ganz in the 2009 “Guila’s Verschwinden”but attendance was low. Myself, however, capable of understanding German enjoyed the evening a lot 🙂

Well, after four days living in Tartu, I dare to make first initial comparisons between both countries, if possible, despite knowing that neither country share many similarities.

#1 – the rain: when it rains, it rains a lot! For hours and hours, including thunder and lighting. The streets are empty (luckily for most pedestrians, cafĂ©s are omnipresent and cheap!) and the air cools down much quicker than in Germany.

#2 – eye contact on the streets: While being in Oldenburg, I experienced that most people keep their eyes straight and avoid holding eye contact for too long. However, in Tartu it seems to be considered impolite to not at least give the passing person a quick glance!

#3 – acceptance towards customers in cafĂ©s: Since I am still waiting for the internet to be made available in my appartment I am spending most of my day in the nearby kohvik metro and refreshing my webmail account, hoping for salvation – but nothing so far. However, I am sitting here for hours only rarely drinking my coffee, ordering even more rarely and taking up space for more “suitable” customers. But so far, I have not experienced any hard feelings from the staff nor the other people. I have witnessed differently in Germany.

These are the first differences I could come up with. Surely over the next few months, I will find more; they shall find its appreciation here, too. Now I will get my residence permission done!

Nägemist!